WORLD BEDWETTING DAY 26 MAY 2020

Posted by Eva Reinander on

TIME TO TAKE ACTION

BEDWETTING IS NOBODY'S FAULT; IT IS A COMMON MEDICAL CONDITION THAT CAN AND SHOULD BE TREATE(1)

For decades, bedwetting was considered as a simple condition that would resolve spontaneously. However, it is now regarded as a complex disorder involving several factors such as bladder dysfunction and the over-production of urine at night.2

Bedwetting does not have a psychological cause, in most cases it is caused by over-production of urine at night, the inability to wake up or reduced capacity of the bladder.2 This medical condition can have a serious detrimental effect on the child’s self-esteem, emotional well-being and day time functioning, including school and social performance.2,3,4 However, the impact on the child and their family is often underestimated and trivialised.5

The International Children’s Continence Society (ICCS) and the European Society for Paediatric Urology (ESPU) launched World Bedwetting Day (WBD) in 2015. This year will mark the fifth consecutive year that the day will be marked globally and it will take place on 26th May 2020 The initiative will continue to raise awareness among the public and healthcare professionals around this common medical condition.

The World Bedwetting Day 2020 theme continues on from previous years and will focus on ‘Time to Take Action’, in recognition that much more can be done to diagnose and treat those children who suffer from bedwetting.

WORLD BEDWETTING DAY - WHY DO WE NEED IT?

Bedwetting is a common medical condition that has a serious impact on a child’s self-esteem, emotional well-being and day time functioning, including school and social performance.2,6

Bedwetting is nobody’s fault, and families and doctors should be able to discuss the condition without embarrassment or guilt. However, the impact is often underestimated and trivialised, so help is not sought or offered.7 By raising awareness of bedwetting as a common condition that can and should be treated1, World Bedwetting Day aims to encourage families to discuss bedwetting with their doctors and get the help they need.

PLEASE VISIT THE BELOW WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

https://www.worldbedwettingday.com/

 

References

1. Hjälmås K et al., Nocturnal Enuresis: An International Evidence Based Management Strategy. J Urol 2004; 171:2545–2561

2. Vande Walle J et al., Practical consensus guidelines for the management of enuresis. Eur J Pediatr 2012; 171:971-983

3. Theunis M et al., Self-Image and Performance in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis. Eur Urol 2002; 41:660-667

4. Joinson C et al., A United Kingdom population-based study of intellectual capacities in children with and without soiling, daytime wetting, and bed-wetting. Pediatrics. 2007; 120:e308-16

 5. Nathan D, Nocturnal enuresis guidelines. Nottingham Children’s Hospital. 2014. 1-17

6. Austin P et al. The Standardization of Terminology of Lower Urinary Tract Function in Children and Adolescents: Update Report from the Standardization Committee of the International Children’s Continence Society, The Journal of Urology . 2014;191:1863-1865

7. Nevéus T, Nocturnal enuresis - theoretic background and practical guidelines. Pediatr Nephrol 2011; 26:1207-1214


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